Grant Skinner

The "g" in gskinner. Also the "skinner".

@gskinner

RegExr v2: Build, Test, & Learn RegEx

RegExr is exactly six years old today. Built in Flex and AS3, it was a largely accidental outcome of exploring a few technical concepts I was interested in at the time (tokenizers/lexers, advanced text interactions, regular expressions).

RegExr v1 circa 2008

I thought the end result might be useful to others struggling to learn or work with RegEx, so I released it online. Its popularity took me by surprise, with around 10M hits and 150K patterns saved to date. This is despite being essentially abandoned since 2008.

I’m happy to announce that the neglect is finally ending, with today’s release of RegExr v2. Rebuilt from scratch in HTML/JS, and (hopefully) improved in every way. I’d like to believe that RegExr v2 is the best way to learn, build and test RegEx online today.

RegExr v2

Key features:

  • clean, modern design
  • video tutorial
  • expression syntax coloring
  • underlines expression errors in red
  • contextual help for all regex tokens and errors on rollover
  • updates matches as you type
  • support for testing substitution/replace
  • full reference of all JS RegEx tokens, with loadable examples
  • searchable database of community submitted patterns
  • drag and drop text files to load their content
  • save and share patterns with others via direct links
  • undo/redo
     

I also dug through over 240 comments on the original blog post, and implemented a ton of suggestions:

  • larger monospaced text and support for browser zoom (my eyes are older, my monitors are larger, and 10pt font just doesn’t seem so cool now)
  • vastly improved tokenizer, that is (hopefully) 100% accurate to JS RegExp standards
  • improved documentation, now with examples
  • support for pasting full expressions (including flags)
  • save includes your sample and substitution text
     

Now that it’s released, we’re going to try not to let it stagnate again. The first order of business is to clean up the code and commit it to the RegExr GitHub repo, so that it becomes a living project with community support.

We’re also going to try to clean up the existing community patterns – likely scrubbing any that now have errors (due to differences in AS3 and JS for example).

Following that, I’m going to be taking a look at different options for wrapping it in a desktop installer, so you can run it offline and save your favourites locally (input on this is welcome). I’d also love to make it usable on mobile devices, not because I think there’s a huge demand for testing regular expressions on mobile phones, but as a challenge to see if it can be done well – I think the “click to insert” feature of the reference library could work really well.

I’m also planning to write up a blog post exploring some of the technical challenges and decisions that we made while building this.

If you enjoy using RegExr, you can help out by tweeting, facebooking, gPlussing, blogging, or otherwise sharing/linking to it so others can find it. Version 1 disappeared almost completely from Google a few months ago (I believe they downgraded pages with only Flash content), and I’d really like it to recover in the rankings.

As always, I’d love to hear what you think of the new version of RegExr, and any feedback on how to make it even better.

Embedding JS Script Tags in WordPress Posts

When you include javascript in a WordPress post, WP automatically applies formatting to the script tag’s contents, causing script errors. This has led to a large number of workarounds, including: plugins, using custom fields, including every script as a separate JS file, and stripping empty lines from the script (to prevent WP from injecting paragraph tags).

I wanted a solution that would let me quickly inject JS directly into my post content, and wouldn’t require any special prep or have dependencies on third party plugins. After unsuccessfully hunting the web for an answer, I came up with a simple approach that uses a pre tag to prevent WordPress from formatting my code:

<pre class="script"><script>
  // code here.
</script></pre>

Then just add the following to your site styles to prevent the pre tag from displaying:

pre.script {
  visibility: hidden;
  display: none;
}

It’s crazy simple and the script executes properly. I’m kind of shocked that I didn’t run into this approach at all in my search. It makes me worry a bit that there’s some glaring flaw with it, but so far it seems to be working great.

Hopefully this saves someone else some time and frustration.

Note: there’s a chance you may need to disable “Settings > Writing > WordPress should correct invalidly nested XHTML automatically” to prevent WP from encoding characters in your code. I have it disabled normally, but in limited testing I didn’t see any problems with it enabled.

Open Source Licenses, JS, and Minification

I’m definitely not a lawyer and I detest reading legalese, but I have a strong interest in the legal considerations of the technology I work with. One area I’ve done a lot of research into in the past is the implications of different open source licenses, which led to this older blog post comparing common licenses.

Recently, one of my devs asked how this applied to JS and minification. Here’s the quick response I tossed together:

Let’s assume we are looking at the MIT license or an equivalent. Remember that ANY third party code requires client approval, and any license other than MIT should be run past me as well.

The MIT license specifically requires that the license is included somewhere in the software, but it does not need to be public facing. Typically, the license is included as a comment at the top of the source files. However, minification strips out the comments and combines source code into a single file. This raises three possible scenarios:


  1. All of the code in the file is under MIT license. In this case, you can inject the copyright statements for each of the libraries followed by the main body of the MIT license above the minified code. We do this automatically for the CreateJS libraries as part of our build process.
  2. Client code & MIT licensed code. I would recommend that all open source code is treated as in #1, and client code is minified into its own file (potentially with a copyright header specified by the client). This is much cleaner than trying to mix them.
  3. Code with different licenses. This gets much more complex, and should be dealt with on a case by case basis.

I’d be interested to hear about how other companies are dealing with this topic, or related ones.

The Great Pumpkin Showdown 2012

Welcome to our most hotly contested pumpkin showdown ever! This year, exciting new teams formed to reshape ordinary pumpkins into masterpieces. Please vote to help decide which pumpkin wins, and which get burned.

For something new this year, the app was crafted for HTML5 using CreateJS. We also continued something old, with the app being built by the newest member of the team, O’Jay.

Continue reading →

Upcoming Talks

I’m excited to be doing talks all over the world in the next couple of months, focusing on two related topics: CreateJS, and the Atari Arcade.

Create The Web, San Francisco, London, Tokyo, & Sydney (Sep & Oct)
I’ll be on an around the world tour with a group of Adobe evangelists (I’m the only non-Adobe presenter), talking about the open source CreateJS libraries, and how to get started creating rich content in HTML5. Adobe is the primary sponsor of the libraries, and is a great partner in helping to actively promote them.

The SF event is full, but you can still sign up free for the other locations here.

Screens, Toronto (Sep 26-28)
Screens focuses on multi-screen content, and I’ll be presenting on the HTML5 Atari Arcade project and some of the challenges we had in making it work well with both desktop and multitouch tablets. You can get more info on the conference here.

FITC Vancouver (Nov 17-18)
Once again, I’ll be talking about the Atari Arcade, and our continuing experiences building games and rich content in HTML5. Despite my (relative) proximity, this will be my first time speaking in Vancouver, and I’m really looking forward to it. More info here.

In addition to the above, I will also likely be hanging out at the MS Build conference Oct 30-Nov 2. I’m pretty excited to see first hand what’s announced with respect to Windows 8, Windows Phone, IE10, and Surface.

It’s going to be a busy autumn, but it should be a lot of fun!

Atari Arcade: Classic Games Reimagined in HTML5

The Atari Arcade has launched! We’ve been working tirelessly with Atari and the Microsoft IE team to re-imagine classic Atari games for the modern web. The games are multi-touch tablet friendly, use the latest crop of modern web standards, are built on top of CreateJS, and run on pretty much any popular current generation browser. We had a ton of fun trying to balance modernizing these games with preserving their iconography and gameplay faithful to the originals.

There’s a lot more to say, but we’re all still recovering from the launch rush, so for now I’d encourage you to check out the arcade, read through the dev center articles on how we built it, and wander over to CreateJS.com to learn about the libraries the games were built on top of.

Update: We have published a Case Study on our site.

Announcing CreateJS

We’ve been working really hard on a lot of great stuff over the last couple months, and I’m thrilled finally to be able to share it with the world.

CreateJS

We’re going to be releasing EaselJS and a number of companion libraries under the new umbrella name “CreateJS”. CreateJS will be a suite of modular libraries and tools which work together to enable rich interactive content on open web technologies (aka HTML5). These libraries will be designed so that they can work completely independently, or you can mix and match as suits your needs. The initial offerings will be: EaselJS, TweenJS, SoundJS, and PreloadJS.

Along with the new name, we’ll also be launching a new site at createjs.com which will consolidate demos, docs, tutorials, community, and showcases for all of the libraries and tools. If you have a project or tutorial you’d like to see featured, tweet it to us: @createjs.

EaselJS

EaselJS provides a display list and interactive model for working with rich graphics on top of the HTML5 canvas (and beyond). It provides an API that is familiar to Flash developers, but embraces javascript sensibilities.

We’re planning a minor v0.4.1 release soon, which includes bug fixes and some minor feature additions. Following that, work will commence on v0.5, which will focus on some larger features, API clean up and consistency, and improved documentation. If you have features you’d like to see in v0.5, add them to the issue list, or tweet them to @createjs, and we’ll see what we can do.

Along with the CreateJS site launch, we will be releasing much improved examples, and links to resources and tutorials developed by the community. Again, let us know if you’ve written a tutorial, or have something cool you’ve built with EaselJS you’d like us to showcase.

TweenJS

TweenJS is a tweening and animation library that works with EaselJS or independently. It offers a deceptively simple interface, and a huge amount of power with support for delays, easing, callbacks, non-numeric properties, sequencing, and plugins.

TweenJS v0.2 will be tagged soon. It will incorporate some fixes and tweaks, along with a full plugin model. After v0.2 our next focus will be on performance and providing better demos and documentation in preparation for the CreateJS launch.

SoundJS

Audio is currently a mess in HTML5, but SoundJS works to abstract away the problems and makes adding sound to your games or rich experiences much easier.

We have a huge v0.2 release in testing right now. It is a ground up rewrite that incorporates a target plugin model that allows you to prioritize what APIs you’d like to use to play audio. For example, you could choose to prioritize WebAudio, then audio tags, then Flash audio. You can query for capabilities (depending on the plugin that is used), and it offers seamless progressive enhancement (for example, panning will work in WebAudio, but will be quietly ignored in HTML audio). Following v0.2 our focus will move to fixing bugs, and delivering plugins for mobile and application platforms like PhoneGap and Win8 Metro for a v0.2.1 release.

PreloadJS

The newest addition to the suite, PreloadJS will make it easy to preload your assets: images, sounds, JS, data, or others. It will use XHR2 to provide real progress information when available, or fall back to tag loading and eased progress when it isn’t. It allows multiple queues, multiple connections, pausing queues, and a lot more. We’re hoping to get a v0.1 build out in the next couple weeks for people to start playing with, and then will focus on fixing bugs, improving documentation, and just generally maturing things for v0.1.1.

Zoë

Zoë is an open source AIR application that converts SWF animations to sprite sheets. It supports some advanced features, like configurable frame reuse and multi-image sheets (important for mobile).

For Zoë v0.2 we’re planning to add support for reading the symbols in a SWF, and letting you select multiple symbols to include in your exported sprite sheet. It’s also worth mentioning here that Flash Pro CS6 will include direct support for exporting sprite sheets for EaselJS, offering a more integrated workflow than Zoë can provide.

Toolkit for CreateJS

We’ve partnered with Adobe to build a fantastic tool for leveraging all of the existing Flash Pro skill that’s out there to build amazing HTML5 experiences. The Toolkit for CreateJS is an extension for Flash Pro that allows you to publish content (including symbols, vectors, animations, bitmaps, sound, and text) for CreateJS & HTML5 as a library of scriptable, instantiable objects.

We’ve worked really hard to develop a workflow that makes sense, and to generate code that is completely human readable, and very small (in some cases the output is smaller than SWF when zlib compressed). You can even write JS code on the Flash timeline, and it will be injected into your published tweens.

Exciting times! If you’d like to stay on top of CreateJS updates, please follow @createjs on Twitter.

Disable Local Security Errors in Chrome

I’m blogging this mainly for my own benefit, so I can look it up easily whenever I need to:

If you’d like to disable security errors generated from accessing local content in Chrome (ex. reading pixels from a local image), just launch it with the “–disable-web-security” param. So on OSX, you’d type this into Terminal:

open /Applications/Google\ Chrome.app –args -disable-web-security

It lasts until you close Chrome. Handy for testing EaselJS content on your local file system.

Update: I’ve posted a .command file that you can double click in the Finder to run this more easily here.